Common Phrases to Know When Traveling Anywhere

going-abroad

You’ve recently attended an World education fair and impressed by the list of international colleges they have at their end. It’s great that you’ve made up your mind for an international degree, but then the thought of visiting a foreign nation may seem scary to some of us. However, make sure, this doesn’t hold you back! No matter how scary it may seem, you can still have a remarkable experience abroad without knowing much of the local language of the destination you plan on moving to. Here are some essential phrases to learn how to say before you go aboard for your higher studies.

 “Hello!” and “Goodbye!”

While it may seem extremely simple and almost inconsequential, a greeting may set the tone for the interactions you’ll have with locals. After all, what better way is there to greet a local than saying “hello” in their local language? Greeting a local in their native tongue shows a sincerity and admiration for their culture, and gives you a boost of poise to start practicing your language skills.

Once you master these two phrases, you may learn other ways to greet people! Try learning informal ways to greet the local friends.

“Thank you.” “Please.” “No, thanks.” “You’re welcome”. “Excuse.” “I’m sorry.”

It’s all about manners! They’re worldwide and will take you further than you think. Make sure to include these phrases on your list.

Numbers: 1-10

There will infinite, several opportunities to use your spanking knowledge of saying the numbers 1-10 in a new language. You’ll use this new skill when purchasing groceries from a store, giving an address to a cab driver, and even bartering with street vendors.

Now, a common question that may pop-up in your mind is- What about numbers above 10? If learning numbers beyond 10 seems to be taxing, get imaginative separate larger numbers into single digits! For instance, if you need to say “55”, saying 5-5 will also solve the problem.

“Where is _____?”, “Right”, “Left”, and “Straight”.

When visiting or living in a foreign nation, it’s useful to know vocabulary, which can help you navigate untried areas. Learning the basics to give or get directions will help you make your way to a train stop, nearest bathroom, or the locale that you’re residing in.

“I would like _____.”

This phrase is particularly useful in a restaurant setting. Once you get used to this phrase you’ll find no trouble in communicating with a server in any foreign nation! Besides, this phrase will also come in handy in scenarios where you’re purchasing something, which is physically beyond your reach.

“Do you speak English?”

If you meet somebody in a foreign nation and you’re uncertain if they speak English, this phrase is superb to have on hand to make communicating a bit simpler. A simple short cut may just be to learn how to say the word ‘English’ in their local tongue — you’ll be amazed by how many individuals will say yes, no matter where you are in the world.

“My name is _____. I am from_____.”/ “What is your name? Where are you from?”

Make sure you how to introduce yourself and say from what country you’re from. It is an impeccable way to meet new people and build relationships with either locals or other participants in your program!

The point is to make communicating abroad as easy as possible for you and to help you show admiration for the culture, which will certainly put a smile on the faces of many locals.  And if you haven’t visited an overseas education fair yet, make sure to do one soon and decide the college of your choice.

Summary: The article points out a list of basic phrases that you should learn before you visit a foreign country.

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One thought on “Common Phrases to Know When Traveling Anywhere

  1. Excellent tips here. I really like the idea of breaking down double digit numbers into single digits. Brilliant idea – I never would have thought of it.

    People seem to really appreciate a visitor who tries to speak their language, however badly.

    Next time I’m travelling to a foreign country, I’ll reference this post! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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